1. notes

    1 week ago

    retro-rewind:

    Mcdonalds pizza 1992

    (via girllookitthatbody-ahh)

  2. notes

    2 weeks ago

    "

    Six simple rituals:

    1. Drink a glass of water when you wake up. Your body loses water while you sleep, so you’re naturally dehydrated in the morning. A glass of water when you wake helps start your day fresh.

    2. Define your top 3. Every morning ask yourself, “What are the top three most important tasks that I will complete today?” Prioritizes your day accordingly and don’t sleep until the Top 3 are complete.

    3. The 50/10 Rule. Solo-task and do more faster by working in 50/10 increments. Use a timer to work for 50 minutes on only one important task with 10 minute breaks in between. Spend your 10 minutes getting away from your desk, going outside, calling friends, meditating, or grabbing a glass of water.

    4. Move and sweat daily. Regular movement keeps us healthy and alert. It boosts energy and mood, and relieves stress.

    5. Express gratitude. Gratitude fosters happiness. Each morning, think of at least five things you’re thankful for. In times of stress, pause and reflect on these things.

    6. Reflect daily. Bring closure to your day through 10 minutes of reflection. Asks yourself, “What went well?” and “What needs improvement?”

    "

    (via losing-every-extra-pound)

    (Source: Fast Company, via losing-every-extra-pound)

  3. notes

    2 weeks ago

    tulipnight:

    Hehuanshan Mountains Seasons by Thunderbolt_TW

    (via losing-every-extra-pound)

  4. notes

    2 weeks ago

    Can you imagine, finally showing your true self to your spouse, your soul mate, and having him not like you?

    (Source: jamiefraiser)

  5. notes

    2 weeks ago

    mikeysmovieblog:

GONE GIRL - 4 stars (out of 5)
He’s only made 10 films in 20 years. This means that every time director David Fincher steps behind the lens, it’s an event (Se7en, The Game, Fight Club, Zodiac, Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Social Network, Girl With the Dragon Tattoo).  Here, with his adaptation of Gone Girl, Fincher indulges in a kind of “greatest hits” incorporation. Playing perfectly to his strengths with almost none of his minor weaknesses, this taut thriller is one of the best mainstream movies of the year. While it wrestles with bigger ideas within its subtext, it never forgets the main purpose behind the genre — to keep audiences members on the edge of their seats and guessing until the final frame.
Ben Affleck stars as Nick Dunne. He is married to Amy (Rosamund Pike in a groundbreaking performance) and, by all accounts, their relationship is good. But all is actually not well in the Dunne household. She resents being brought back to the Midwest from New York. He’s barely holding onto the bar he now owns with his sister Margo (Carrie Coon). Then, on their fifth wedding anniversary, Amy simply disappears. Foul play is suspected, and Nick is immediately the prime suspect. The press have a field day with a story, while the police hound Nick’s every move. Eventually, he hires a hotshot lawyer (Tyler Perry) while an old boyfriend of Amy’s (Neil Patrick Harris), may hold some answers.
 Fincher always casts well, and Gone Girl is no exception. Ben Affleck as our sudden media uber-subject is pitch perfect as the man not wholly unaccustomed to the spotlight. His reactions once the media swarms are both dead-on and defiant. He’s not about to play their games and yet consistently falls right into the 24 hour news cycle trap. Equally impressive is newcomer Carrie Coon. As Nick’s sister, she’s illuminating, adding subtext we didn’t know existed just by her reactions and readings. As the detectives trying to find Amy, Patrick Fugit (all grown up from Almost Famous) and Kim Dickens make an unlikely but effective team. As he does with all his former police films, Fincher finds the truth in even the most eerie and insane places.
But the movie belongs to Rosamund Pike, who is required to play both sides of the film female stereotype…and she soars. When she’s kind and gentile, we completely buy it. When she’s cunning and conniving, we are equally convinced. Our reaction to Amy is what makes Gone Girl such a stellar experience. At first, we want to believe her. Then we want to blame Nick. But as he does with all his films, Fincher finds layers within layers, and upon each reveal, our entire notion of what’s going on changes. Yet the movie is not about the “gotcha.” Instead, Fincher hypnotizes us, the eventual culminations (there’s a couple here) shocking us because they seem organic to everything else that’s happening.
As fresh and seamlessly it is presented, the film could have benefited from a bit less time in concluding the story. It seems a bit over-cooked by the time hour two rolls around. Still it’s a minute fault to an otherwise pitch perfect thriller that had me guessing to the finale.
So, as he has done almost every time he has helmed a movie, David Fincher truly delivers the goods with Gone Girl. It should do well when award season comes around. It’s a smartly written, modern thriller with enough quirks and eccentricities to remind you of how satisfying a film made by true visionaries can be.

    mikeysmovieblog:

    GONE GIRL - 4 stars (out of 5)

    He’s only made 10 films in 20 years. This means that every time director David Fincher steps behind the lens, it’s an event (Se7en, The Game, Fight Club, Zodiac, Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Social Network, Girl With the Dragon Tattoo).  Here, with his adaptation of Gone Girl, Fincher indulges in a kind of “greatest hits” incorporation. Playing perfectly to his strengths with almost none of his minor weaknesses, this taut thriller is one of the best mainstream movies of the year. While it wrestles with bigger ideas within its subtext, it never forgets the main purpose behind the genre — to keep audiences members on the edge of their seats and guessing until the final frame.

    Ben Affleck stars as Nick Dunne. He is married to Amy (Rosamund Pike in a groundbreaking performance) and, by all accounts, their relationship is good. But all is actually not well in the Dunne household. She resents being brought back to the Midwest from New York. He’s barely holding onto the bar he now owns with his sister Margo (Carrie Coon). Then, on their fifth wedding anniversary, Amy simply disappears. Foul play is suspected, and Nick is immediately the prime suspect. The press have a field day with a story, while the police hound Nick’s every move. Eventually, he hires a hotshot lawyer (Tyler Perry) while an old boyfriend of Amy’s (Neil Patrick Harris), may hold some answers.

     Fincher always casts well, and Gone Girl is no exception. Ben Affleck as our sudden media uber-subject is pitch perfect as the man not wholly unaccustomed to the spotlight. His reactions once the media swarms are both dead-on and defiant. He’s not about to play their games and yet consistently falls right into the 24 hour news cycle trap. Equally impressive is newcomer Carrie Coon. As Nick’s sister, she’s illuminating, adding subtext we didn’t know existed just by her reactions and readings. As the detectives trying to find Amy, Patrick Fugit (all grown up from Almost Famous) and Kim Dickens make an unlikely but effective team. As he does with all his former police films, Fincher finds the truth in even the most eerie and insane places.

    But the movie belongs to Rosamund Pike, who is required to play both sides of the film female stereotype…and she soars. When she’s kind and gentile, we completely buy it. When she’s cunning and conniving, we are equally convinced. Our reaction to Amy is what makes Gone Girl such a stellar experience. At first, we want to believe her. Then we want to blame Nick. But as he does with all his films, Fincher finds layers within layers, and upon each reveal, our entire notion of what’s going on changes. Yet the movie is not about the “gotcha.” Instead, Fincher hypnotizes us, the eventual culminations (there’s a couple here) shocking us because they seem organic to everything else that’s happening.

    As fresh and seamlessly it is presented, the film could have benefited from a bit less time in concluding the story. It seems a bit over-cooked by the time hour two rolls around. Still it’s a minute fault to an otherwise pitch perfect thriller that had me guessing to the finale.

    So, as he has done almost every time he has helmed a movie, David Fincher truly delivers the goods with Gone Girl. It should do well when award season comes around. It’s a smartly written, modern thriller with enough quirks and eccentricities to remind you of how satisfying a film made by true visionaries can be.

  6. notes

    2 weeks ago

    sharkchunks:

Fincher’s best since Fight Club. Hitchcock meets Polanski with a very striking dash of Paul Verhoeven. Maybe even a tiny tiny streak of Coen Bros. A procedural drama for an hour that turns into a crazy dark comedy for a second hour and then turns into a nasty psychological thriller for its last 30 minutes. Great performances, especially from Rosamund Pike. Good music, Atticus/Reznor’s best movie score yet, and by far the best, most interesting movie of the Fincher’s digital era.
And they advertised a Nicolas Sparks movie in front of it. That’s the most fucked up thing of all.

    sharkchunks:

    Fincher’s best since Fight Club. Hitchcock meets Polanski with a very striking dash of Paul Verhoeven. Maybe even a tiny tiny streak of Coen Bros. A procedural drama for an hour that turns into a crazy dark comedy for a second hour and then turns into a nasty psychological thriller for its last 30 minutes. Great performances, especially from Rosamund Pike. Good music, Atticus/Reznor’s best movie score yet, and by far the best, most interesting movie of the Fincher’s digital era.

    And they advertised a Nicolas Sparks movie in front of it. That’s the most fucked up thing of all.

  7. notes

    2 weeks ago

    (Source: argentallie)

  8. notes

    2 weeks ago

    the question i’ve asked most often during our marriage, if not out loud, if not to the person who could answer. i suppose these questions storm cloud over every marriage: what are you thinking? how are you feeling? who are you? what have we done to each other?

                                   w h a t   w i l l   w e   d o ?

    (Source: lastisle)

  9. notes

    1 month ago

    kia-kaha-winchesters:

    just the girly things

    • forcing an earing through a closed piercing
    • taking off tight clothes and rubbing the indents they left on your skin 
    • human sacrifice
    • homemade face masks 

    (via vikkyjenkins)

  10. notes

    1 month ago

    banderboucher:

    it’s not a sunday unless you completely waste it then feel really sad around 8pm

    (via vikkyjenkins)

  11. notes

    1 month ago

    kobetyrant:

    GOODBYE JOAN

    (via iheartqueenbey)

  12. notes

    1 month ago

    ourtimeorg:

Good question…

    ourtimeorg:

    Good question…

    (via liberalsarecool)

  13. notes

    1 month ago

    flawlessvevo:

    I don’t regret making this. 

    (via fuckyesbeyonce)

  14. notes

    1 month ago

  15. notes

    4 months ago

    circumcisions:

    first edition of beyonces pepsi commercial

    (Source: thisblogisnotgovernmentapproved, via tyleroakley)